Rehabilitation and Neural Engineering Laboratory

Post-Doc Position on Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Restoration of Movement

Our Research

Work in the RNEL spans a spectrum of neurophysiology and neuroprosthetics research, ranging from non-human primate and other preclinical studies to research in individuals with disabilities. We specifically emphasize translational and clinical neural engineering research.

Post-Doc Position on Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Restoration of Movement

This is a full-time post doc position within the context human neuroprosthetic systems for the restoration of movement in subjects with motor deficits from traumatic or neurodegenerative disorders.  The candidate will work closely with an interdisciplinary team of neural engineers, neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuroscientists and electrical engineers. With the supervision and support from the faculty investigators, the candidate is will be encouraged to develop independent research projects/expertise, grant writing skills, high-impact paper writing skills and develop fellowship grant proposals.  

The candidate will focus their work on the testing of spinal cord stimulation for the restoration of arm and hand movement in human clinical trials. The candidate will have the opportunity to choose a more engineering-oriented research path focusing on the development of the neurotechnology system and stimulation control, or alternatively a more clinical path focusing on the evaluation of clinical outcomes. There will be opportunities to closely interact with multiple faculty investigators from clinical, engineering, and basic science departments across both the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University campuses.

The candidate should possess a background in Neural Engineering, Neuroscience, Biomedical Engineering or Physical/Occupational Therapy. The candidate should have skills in at least some of these areas:

  • Neuroengineering
  • Electrophysiology
  • Physical Therapy
  • Movement Analysis
  • Functional Electrical Stimulation

For Info:

Marco Capogrosso

mcapo@pitt.edu